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In the far south of Mexico lies a state that is little changed for centuries. It's people are Indians with an age-old caste system. Here is lush vegetation Magnificent peaks and soil that produces very good coffee. The region Is called Chiapas. A further 150 odd miles on you find the Guatamalan border and from Chiapas right down some distance therein grow forests of some excellent hardwoods. Prime among these is rosewood, Used for the keys of the marimba to give it's distinctive mellow sound. Not surprisingly here the marimba is king, though the name is thought to be of African origin. Orchestras consisting of little more than the marimba abound and appropriately most of the program on this this CD originates from that region. It's very different from anything heard north of the Rio Grande or in Europe, but has a rhythmic hypnotic beat. There are typically six or so marimba in these orchestras, but they are really co-operative since there is no leader each of the members takes turns to solo just like a jazz combo and you never see them use sheet music, it's all improvised. About twice a year they set out in a tattered old bus on the marathon journey of some 900 miles to Mexico City where this and many other recordings were made and take the chance to do concerts, all of which help their sparse economy. This unusual CD can be enjoyed by everyone and if you're wondering "Woods that sing" is native for marimba.
In the far south of Mexico lies a state that is little changed for centuries. It's people are Indians with an age-old caste system. Here is lush vegetation Magnificent peaks and soil that produces very good coffee. The region Is called Chiapas. A further 150 odd miles on you find the Guatamalan border and from Chiapas right down some distance therein grow forests of some excellent hardwoods. Prime among these is rosewood, Used for the keys of the marimba to give it's distinctive mellow sound. Not surprisingly here the marimba is king, though the name is thought to be of African origin. Orchestras consisting of little more than the marimba abound and appropriately most of the program on this this CD originates from that region. It's very different from anything heard north of the Rio Grande or in Europe, but has a rhythmic hypnotic beat. There are typically six or so marimba in these orchestras, but they are really co-operative since there is no leader each of the members takes turns to solo just like a jazz combo and you never see them use sheet music, it's all improvised. About twice a year they set out in a tattered old bus on the marathon journey of some 900 miles to Mexico City where this and many other recordings were made and take the chance to do concerts, all of which help their sparse economy. This unusual CD can be enjoyed by everyone and if you're wondering "Woods that sing" is native for marimba.
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In the far south of Mexico lies a state that is little changed for centuries. It's people are Indians with an age-old caste system. Here is lush vegetation Magnificent peaks and soil that produces very good coffee. The region Is called Chiapas. A further 150 odd miles on you find the Guatamalan border and from Chiapas right down some distance therein grow forests of some excellent hardwoods. Prime among these is rosewood, Used for the keys of the marimba to give it's distinctive mellow sound. Not surprisingly here the marimba is king, though the name is thought to be of African origin. Orchestras consisting of little more than the marimba abound and appropriately most of the program on this this CD originates from that region. It's very different from anything heard north of the Rio Grande or in Europe, but has a rhythmic hypnotic beat. There are typically six or so marimba in these orchestras, but they are really co-operative since there is no leader each of the members takes turns to solo just like a jazz combo and you never see them use sheet music, it's all improvised. About twice a year they set out in a tattered old bus on the marathon journey of some 900 miles to Mexico City where this and many other recordings were made and take the chance to do concerts, all of which help their sparse economy. This unusual CD can be enjoyed by everyone and if you're wondering "Woods that sing" is native for marimba.
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