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Kate Bollingers songs tend to linger well beyond their run times, filling the negative space of ordinary days with charming melodies and smart phrasings. She writes them at home in Richmond, Virginia, letting her subconscious lead, an open-ended process she likens to dreaming. From a chord progression appears a line, maybe a syllable will start to stick, enough to pursue, but she says sometimes the words dont feel like her own, more like shapes that form in the minds sky. While many are personal and deal with the emotions that surface with finding her place in the world, shed prefer they be whatever youd like them to be, to connect with listeners in their own way. Bollingers musical universe is relaxed, tender, and unassuming; within lives a timeless sensibility, a songwriters knack for noticing the little things and their counterpoints. Darkness and light, pain and pleasure, reality and escape. These all have space to be seen on her new EP, Look at it in the Light, her first project on Ghostly International, arriving in spring 2022.

Bollingers project is collaborative; she shoots music videos with her friends and colors each of her folk-pop songs with musicians in her community. An agile group of players with backgrounds in jazz, they recorded her first EP, I Dont Wanna Lose, as live takes in a single day, then slowed it down to build out her 2020 EP, A word becomes a sound. Bollinger sings quickly at times; she jokes that can get her in to trouble when it comes to playing live, some of these songs are going to be a mouthful. Shes always been drawn to singers in that free-flowing style and got into the habit of writing quickly while watching her longtime collaborator John Trainum work with rappers in the studio.

Forced to finish her last EP in lockdown, Bollinger, Trainum, and players excitedly returned to sessions in the spring of 2021 to explore a new batch of songs. The parameters were different this time, Bollinger explains, We wanted to make limiting decisions and to stick with them, rather than leave things open, and we wanted to hear certain flaws and parts of the process. Inspired by the music of the 60s and70s, particularly a lot of the old Beatles demos, they focused on the orientation and clarity of sound. I like being able to hear the bass, the guitar, the drums, the keys, and for each instrument to be playing a singular part that is good enough to stand alone.

That clarity carries over into EPs themes; the title Look at it in the Light is a reference to the aspects of Bollingers life that she knows need examining. For one, theres her persistent resistance to change she chooses to ignore it on the title track (I try not to notice / I deny my fate), as wiry strums sync with crisp drums. She surrenders to comfort on Who Am I But Someone, a light and softly psychedelic number that shuffles through the measures to which I will go in order to avoid having to uproot the familiar things in my life. Bollinger recorded the demo with Trainum and guitaristChris Lewis in their shared month-to-month storage space, building on a composition she had written alone, later completing it in the studio with the full band. Yards /Gardens finds Bollinger in full swing, skipping verses of uncertainty above a bright and nimble bassline and kick. Guitar riffs unravel across the bridge, trailing her lines like ellipses.

The string-backed Lady in the Darkest Hour is the sets most luxuriant statement, recorded during a session at Matthew E. Whites Spacebomb Studios with in-house arranger Trey Pollard (Natalie Prass, Helado Negro). Here her lines ring bittersweet yet reassuring, uplifted by swells of golden-hued instrumentation. Searching for meaning, Bollinger mirrors her subject in beaming delivery, curving the words atop the rhythm and melody.

From the hushed abstractions of I Found Out to the biting suspicions of closerConnecting Dots, Kate Bollinger uses every inch of this dazzling EP to find her foot-ing amidst the ever-present sways of life.

Kate Bollingers songs tend to linger well beyond their run times, filling the negative space of ordinary days with charming melodies and smart phrasings. She writes them at home in Richmond, Virginia, letting her subconscious lead, an open-ended process she likens to dreaming. From a chord progression appears a line, maybe a syllable will start to stick, enough to pursue, but she says sometimes the words dont feel like her own, more like shapes that form in the minds sky. While many are personal and deal with the emotions that surface with finding her place in the world, shed prefer they be whatever youd like them to be, to connect with listeners in their own way. Bollingers musical universe is relaxed, tender, and unassuming; within lives a timeless sensibility, a songwriters knack for noticing the little things and their counterpoints. Darkness and light, pain and pleasure, reality and escape. These all have space to be seen on her new EP, Look at it in the Light, her first project on Ghostly International, arriving in spring 2022.

Bollingers project is collaborative; she shoots music videos with her friends and colors each of her folk-pop songs with musicians in her community. An agile group of players with backgrounds in jazz, they recorded her first EP, I Dont Wanna Lose, as live takes in a single day, then slowed it down to build out her 2020 EP, A word becomes a sound. Bollinger sings quickly at times; she jokes that can get her in to trouble when it comes to playing live, some of these songs are going to be a mouthful. Shes always been drawn to singers in that free-flowing style and got into the habit of writing quickly while watching her longtime collaborator John Trainum work with rappers in the studio.

Forced to finish her last EP in lockdown, Bollinger, Trainum, and players excitedly returned to sessions in the spring of 2021 to explore a new batch of songs. The parameters were different this time, Bollinger explains, We wanted to make limiting decisions and to stick with them, rather than leave things open, and we wanted to hear certain flaws and parts of the process. Inspired by the music of the 60s and70s, particularly a lot of the old Beatles demos, they focused on the orientation and clarity of sound. I like being able to hear the bass, the guitar, the drums, the keys, and for each instrument to be playing a singular part that is good enough to stand alone.

That clarity carries over into EPs themes; the title Look at it in the Light is a reference to the aspects of Bollingers life that she knows need examining. For one, theres her persistent resistance to change she chooses to ignore it on the title track (I try not to notice / I deny my fate), as wiry strums sync with crisp drums. She surrenders to comfort on Who Am I But Someone, a light and softly psychedelic number that shuffles through the measures to which I will go in order to avoid having to uproot the familiar things in my life. Bollinger recorded the demo with Trainum and guitaristChris Lewis in their shared month-to-month storage space, building on a composition she had written alone, later completing it in the studio with the full band. Yards /Gardens finds Bollinger in full swing, skipping verses of uncertainty above a bright and nimble bassline and kick. Guitar riffs unravel across the bridge, trailing her lines like ellipses.

The string-backed Lady in the Darkest Hour is the sets most luxuriant statement, recorded during a session at Matthew E. Whites Spacebomb Studios with in-house arranger Trey Pollard (Natalie Prass, Helado Negro). Here her lines ring bittersweet yet reassuring, uplifted by swells of golden-hued instrumentation. Searching for meaning, Bollinger mirrors her subject in beaming delivery, curving the words atop the rhythm and melody.

From the hushed abstractions of I Found Out to the biting suspicions of closerConnecting Dots, Kate Bollinger uses every inch of this dazzling EP to find her foot-ing amidst the ever-present sways of life.

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Kate Bollingers songs tend to linger well beyond their run times, filling the negative space of ordinary days with charming melodies and smart phrasings. She writes them at home in Richmond, Virginia, letting her subconscious lead, an open-ended process she likens to dreaming. From a chord progression appears a line, maybe a syllable will start to stick, enough to pursue, but she says sometimes the words dont feel like her own, more like shapes that form in the minds sky. While many are personal and deal with the emotions that surface with finding her place in the world, shed prefer they be whatever youd like them to be, to connect with listeners in their own way. Bollingers musical universe is relaxed, tender, and unassuming; within lives a timeless sensibility, a songwriters knack for noticing the little things and their counterpoints. Darkness and light, pain and pleasure, reality and escape. These all have space to be seen on her new EP, Look at it in the Light, her first project on Ghostly International, arriving in spring 2022.

Bollingers project is collaborative; she shoots music videos with her friends and colors each of her folk-pop songs with musicians in her community. An agile group of players with backgrounds in jazz, they recorded her first EP, I Dont Wanna Lose, as live takes in a single day, then slowed it down to build out her 2020 EP, A word becomes a sound. Bollinger sings quickly at times; she jokes that can get her in to trouble when it comes to playing live, some of these songs are going to be a mouthful. Shes always been drawn to singers in that free-flowing style and got into the habit of writing quickly while watching her longtime collaborator John Trainum work with rappers in the studio.

Forced to finish her last EP in lockdown, Bollinger, Trainum, and players excitedly returned to sessions in the spring of 2021 to explore a new batch of songs. The parameters were different this time, Bollinger explains, We wanted to make limiting decisions and to stick with them, rather than leave things open, and we wanted to hear certain flaws and parts of the process. Inspired by the music of the 60s and70s, particularly a lot of the old Beatles demos, they focused on the orientation and clarity of sound. I like being able to hear the bass, the guitar, the drums, the keys, and for each instrument to be playing a singular part that is good enough to stand alone.

That clarity carries over into EPs themes; the title Look at it in the Light is a reference to the aspects of Bollingers life that she knows need examining. For one, theres her persistent resistance to change she chooses to ignore it on the title track (I try not to notice / I deny my fate), as wiry strums sync with crisp drums. She surrenders to comfort on Who Am I But Someone, a light and softly psychedelic number that shuffles through the measures to which I will go in order to avoid having to uproot the familiar things in my life. Bollinger recorded the demo with Trainum and guitaristChris Lewis in their shared month-to-month storage space, building on a composition she had written alone, later completing it in the studio with the full band. Yards /Gardens finds Bollinger in full swing, skipping verses of uncertainty above a bright and nimble bassline and kick. Guitar riffs unravel across the bridge, trailing her lines like ellipses.

The string-backed Lady in the Darkest Hour is the sets most luxuriant statement, recorded during a session at Matthew E. Whites Spacebomb Studios with in-house arranger Trey Pollard (Natalie Prass, Helado Negro). Here her lines ring bittersweet yet reassuring, uplifted by swells of golden-hued instrumentation. Searching for meaning, Bollinger mirrors her subject in beaming delivery, curving the words atop the rhythm and melody.

From the hushed abstractions of I Found Out to the biting suspicions of closerConnecting Dots, Kate Bollinger uses every inch of this dazzling EP to find her foot-ing amidst the ever-present sways of life.

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